Once Upon a Time in War is a photographic retrospect of the Great War, World War II, the Cold War, and the War on Terror ++about

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Photograph

A French priest prays with a wounded US Army soldier during what would be a typical Sunday service in Mont St. Michel, France.

A French priest prays with a wounded US Army soldier during what would be a typical Sunday service in Mont St. Michel, France.

November 10, 2011, 12:06pm / 68

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The bodies of the dead German soldiers who, the night before, attempted to overtake the 101st Airborne command post at Bastonge.

The bodies of the dead German soldiers who, the night before, attempted to overtake the 101st Airborne command post at Bastonge.

November 08, 2011, 7:36pm / 66

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Twice within five minutes chaplains came running. One of those occasions haunted me for hours. The wounded man was still semiconscious. The chaplain said, “I’m going to say a prayer for you.”
Somehow this stark announcement hit me like a hammer. He didn’t say, “I’m going to pray for you to get well,” he just said he was going to say a prayer, and it was obvious to me that he meant the final prayer. It was as though he had said, “Brother, you may not know it, but your goose is cooked.” Anyhow, he voiced the prayer, and the weak, gasping man tried vainly to repeat the words after him. When he had finished the chaplain added, “You’re doing fine, you’re doing fine.” Then he rose and dashed off on to some other call, and the wardboys went about their duties.
The dying man was left utterly alone, just lying there on his litter on the ground, lying in an aisle, because the tent was full. Of course it couldn’t be otherwise, but the aloneness of that man as he went through the last few minutes of his life was what tormented me. I felt like going over and at least holding his hand while he died, but it would have been out of order and I didn’t do it.
I wish now I had.

Brave Men “Medics and Causalities,” Erine Pyle

Twice within five minutes chaplains came running. One of those occasions haunted me for hours. The wounded man was still semiconscious. The chaplain said, “I’m going to say a prayer for you.”

Somehow this stark announcement hit me like a hammer. He didn’t say, “I’m going to pray for you to get well,” he just said he was going to say a prayer, and it was obvious to me that he meant the final prayer. It was as though he had said, “Brother, you may not know it, but your goose is cooked.” Anyhow, he voiced the prayer, and the weak, gasping man tried vainly to repeat the words after him. When he had finished the chaplain added, “You’re doing fine, you’re doing fine.” Then he rose and dashed off on to some other call, and the wardboys went about their duties.

The dying man was left utterly alone, just lying there on his litter on the ground, lying in an aisle, because the tent was full. Of course it couldn’t be otherwise, but the aloneness of that man as he went through the last few minutes of his life was what tormented me. I felt like going over and at least holding his hand while he died, but it would have been out of order and I didn’t do it.

I wish now I had.

Brave Men “Medics and Causalities,” Erine Pyle

November 07, 2011, 11:40pm / 88

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I intend to fight. If necessary, I shall die fighting, but don’t worry about this because no war can be won without young men dying. Those things which are precious are saved only by sacrifice.

I intend to fight. If necessary, I shall die fighting, but don’t worry about this because no war can be won without young men dying. Those things which are precious are saved only by sacrifice.

November 06, 2011, 11:03am / 77

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A Soviet medic (who is a badass female if you can’t tell) carrying an injured comrade off the front lines.

A Soviet medic (who is a badass female if you can’t tell) carrying an injured comrade off the front lines.

October 13, 2011, 12:26am / 109

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These 30 young Americans from Nebraska to Florida were on the first US Army casualty list of this war. They were killed in action in Japan’s surprise bombardment of Pearl Harbor, Dec. 7. They are only a few of the total casualties, now estimated at 3,000, and their names are among the last to appear in a public casualty list for the war’s duration.

September 22, 2011, 9:15pm / 20

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A wounded American being assisted by two German soldiers as they march to their collecting point. He’d been brought in from No Man’s Land and was photographed while being placed on a jeep. The two Germans had been taken prisoner in the Allied offensive south of Colmar, France.

A wounded American being assisted by two German soldiers as they march to their collecting point. He’d been brought in from No Man’s Land and was photographed while being placed on a jeep. The two Germans had been taken prisoner in the Allied offensive south of Colmar, France.

September 10, 2011, 6:40pm / 108

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During an aerial Allied attack in the Libyan desert this German sought cover in a make shift bomb shelter. He didn’t make it.

During an aerial Allied attack in the Libyan desert this German sought cover in a make shift bomb shelter.

He didn’t make it.

September 06, 2011, 2:00pm / 66

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