Once Upon a Time in War is a photographic retrospect of the Great War, World War II, the Cold War, and the War on Terror ++about

Owner: Lux, UCF student of history

Questions? war@swallowthesky

donate to keep us running

Photograph

As seen in the May 1945 edition of Life Magazine, this map shows 9,000,000 foreign displaced persons in Germany, who they are, where they were when liberated by Allied forces and where they want to return.

As seen in the May 1945 edition of Life Magazine, this map shows 9,000,000 foreign displaced persons in Germany, who they are, where they were when liberated by Allied forces and where they want to return.

/ September 27, 2012 / 122

Bookmark and Share

Photograph

Dense jungles, like this one in which Australians are marching single file, cover about three-quarters of Malaya and lie between the Japanese and Singapore. The jungle is pitch black in spots and dotted with pill-boxes. The few roads of Malaya are minded as well, acting as a natural defense against the invading enemy forces (LIFE, 22 Dec 1941)

Dense jungles, like this one in which Australians are marching single file, cover about three-quarters of Malaya and lie between the Japanese and Singapore. The jungle is pitch black in spots and dotted with pill-boxes. The few roads of Malaya are minded as well, acting as a natural defense against the invading enemy forces (LIFE, 22 Dec 1941)

/ September 23, 2011 / 80

Bookmark and Share

Video

LIFE Dec 22, 1941

September 23, 2011, 12:00pm / 45

Bookmark and Share

Video

These 30 young Americans from Nebraska to Florida were on the first US Army casualty list of this war. They were killed in action in Japan’s surprise bombardment of Pearl Harbor, Dec. 7. They are only a few of the total casualties, now estimated at 3,000, and their names are among the last to appear in a public casualty list for the war’s duration.

September 22, 2011, 9:15pm / 20

Bookmark and Share

Photograph

Jun 22, 1942 Vol. 12, No. 25 A wartime issue of Life magazine for June 22, 1942. Here are some of the more interesting reads dealing with the war:
Three greatest nations sign alliances
Great Russian Army fights on toward second summer of growing power
USS Lexington, pride of US fleet, sinks to a hero’s grave in Pacific
Newsreel Shots: British occupation of Vichy’s Madagascar
A Boy Come Homes: Parents get back a product of Hitler’s education
Furlough Brides
Read the entire magazine from beginning here.

Jun 22, 1942
Vol. 12, No. 25

A wartime issue of Life magazine for June 22, 1942.
Here are some of the more interesting reads dealing with the war:

Read the entire magazine from beginning here.

/ June 22, 2011 / 30

Bookmark and Share

Photograph

As Winston Churchill addressed the British troops on the banks of the Rhine on March 26, I heard him say: "We are now entering the dire sink of iniquity." These seemed strange words and I did not understand the full meaning of them until today, when at Belsen I witnessed the ultimate in human degradation. There the six-square-mile, barbed-wire enclosure in the heart of a rich agricultural center has been a hell on earth for 60,000 men, women & children of a dozen different nationalities who were being gradually starved to death by SS guards under a brutish, pigeyed leader, Captain Kramer. During the month of March, 17,000 people died of starvation, and they still die at the rate of 300 to 350 every 24 hours, far beyond the help of the British authorities, who are doing all possible to save as many as still have strength to react to treatment.  Children & Corpses. The magnitude of suffering and horror at Belsen cannot be expressed in words and even I, as an actual witness, found it impossible to comprehend fully—there was too much of it: it was too contrary to all principles of humanity—and I was coldly stunned. Under the pine trees the scattered dead were lying, not in twos or threes or dozens, but in thousands. The living tore ragged clothing from the corpses to build fires over which they boiled pine needles and roots for soup. Little children rested their heads against the stinking corpses of their mothers, too nearly dead themselves to cry. A man hobbled up to me and spoke to me in German. I couldn’t understand what he said and I shall never know, for he fell dead at my feet in the middle of his sentence.  The living lay side by side with the dead, their shriveled limbs and shrunken features making them almost indistinguishable. Women tore away their clothing and scratched the hordes of lice which fed on their emaciated bodies; rotten with dysentery, they relieved themselves where they lay and the stench was appalling. Naked bodies with gaping wounds in their backs and chests showed where those who still had the strength to use a knife had cut out the kidneys, livers and hearts of their fellow men and eaten them that they themselves might live.  Fat, Fleshy, Inhuman. Over all this the SS guards—both girls and men—had watched coldly and unmoved. I saw them too—fat, fleshy and inhuman. Now they have a different role in the camp. Under British guard they are made to collect the dead and drag them to a mass grave. From dawn to dusk the SS girls and men alike hold in their arms the bodies of the men, women & children whom they killed, and British Tommies, roused for once to a burning fury, allow them no respite. It is their just reward. Perhaps it can all be summed up in the few croaking words that came from a pitiful pile of rags and bones that lay at my feet: "Look, Englishman, this is German culture."
LIFE Correspondent George Rodger, April 30 1945 at Bergen-Belsen

As Winston Churchill addressed the British troops on the banks of the Rhine on March 26, I heard him say: "We are now entering the dire sink of iniquity." These seemed strange words and I did not understand the full meaning of them until today, when at Belsen I witnessed the ultimate in human degradation. There the six-square-mile, barbed-wire enclosure in the heart of a rich agricultural center has been a hell on earth for 60,000 men, women & children of a dozen different nationalities who were being gradually starved to death by SS guards under a brutish, pigeyed leader, Captain Kramer. During the month of March, 17,000 people died of starvation, and they still die at the rate of 300 to 350 every 24 hours, far beyond the help of the British authorities, who are doing all possible to save as many as still have strength to react to treatment.

Children & Corpses. The magnitude of suffering and horror at Belsen cannot be expressed in words and even I, as an actual witness, found it impossible to comprehend fully—there was too much of it: it was too contrary to all principles of humanity—and I was coldly stunned. Under the pine trees the scattered dead were lying, not in twos or threes or dozens, but in thousands. The living tore ragged clothing from the corpses to build fires over which they boiled pine needles and roots for soup. Little children rested their heads against the stinking corpses of their mothers, too nearly dead themselves to cry. A man hobbled up to me and spoke to me in German. I couldn’t understand what he said and I shall never know, for he fell dead at my feet in the middle of his sentence.

The living lay side by side with the dead, their shriveled limbs and shrunken features making them almost indistinguishable. Women tore away their clothing and scratched the hordes of lice which fed on their emaciated bodies; rotten with dysentery, they relieved themselves where they lay and the stench was appalling. Naked bodies with gaping wounds in their backs and chests showed where those who still had the strength to use a knife had cut out the kidneys, livers and hearts of their fellow men and eaten them that they themselves might live.

Fat, Fleshy, Inhuman. Over all this the SS guards—both girls and men—had watched coldly and unmoved. I saw them too—fat, fleshy and inhuman. Now they have a different role in the camp. Under British guard they are made to collect the dead and drag them to a mass grave. From dawn to dusk the SS girls and men alike hold in their arms the bodies of the men, women & children whom they killed, and British Tommies, roused for once to a burning fury, allow them no respite. It is their just reward.

Perhaps it can all be summed up in the few croaking words that came from a pitiful pile of rags and bones that lay at my feet: "Look, Englishman, this is German culture."

LIFE Correspondent George Rodger, April 30 1945 at Bergen-Belsen

/ May 09, 2011 / 97

Bookmark and Share

Photograph

Life photographer W. Eugene Smith in the Pacific

Life photographer W. Eugene Smith in the Pacific

/ April 17, 2011 / 13

Bookmark and Share

Photograph

At an Army encampment near a southern California aircraft factory last month, perky movie starlet Marilyn Hare embarked on one of the most formidable morale-building project yet contrived for the U.S. Army. A good fighting machine, she knew, thrives on joie de vivre. From her father, the late Ernie Hare of the famed pioneering radio team called the Happiness Boys, 18-year-old Marilyn had learned the art of evoking merriment in others. But in this hour of national crisis, Miss Hare had evolved a unique inspirational program of her own. It was her aspiration to kiss 10,000 soldiers.Bright and early on Feb. 5 squads of soldiers assembled in the balmy California sunshine. Bright and early merry Marilyn arrived for her great undertaking. She mounted a soapbox and as kind of musical hors d’oeuvres sang Kiss The Boys Goodbye to an accordion accompaniment. Then, stepping down, she went to work.First she passed down the aisles giving each grinning trooper a taste of her pretty lips. Since other soldiers had duties elsewhere in camp, she wandered from barracks to soup kitchens to sentry posts. There was no shortage or second rations. She left each soldier well-bussed and bemused. At day’s end her kissometer recorded 733 smacks. The effect on morale was terrific. As they staggered back to their chores, Marilyn’s be-lipsticked beneficiaries mumbled dreamily: “We won’t wash our faces for a month.”
Life, March 2 1942 

At an Army encampment near a southern California aircraft factory last month, perky movie starlet Marilyn Hare embarked on one of the most formidable morale-building project yet contrived for the U.S. Army. A good fighting machine, she knew, thrives on joie de vivre. From her father, the late Ernie Hare of the famed pioneering radio team called the Happiness Boys, 18-year-old Marilyn had learned the art of evoking merriment in others. But in this hour of national crisis, Miss Hare had evolved a unique inspirational program of her own. It was her aspiration to kiss 10,000 soldiers.

Bright and early on Feb. 5 squads of soldiers assembled in the balmy California sunshine. Bright and early merry Marilyn arrived for her great undertaking. She mounted a soapbox and as kind of musical hors d’oeuvres sang Kiss The Boys Goodbye to an accordion accompaniment. Then, stepping down, she went to work.

First she passed down the aisles giving each grinning trooper a taste of her pretty lips. Since other soldiers had duties elsewhere in camp, she wandered from barracks to soup kitchens to sentry posts. There was no shortage or second rations. She left each soldier well-bussed and bemused. At day’s end her kissometer recorded 733 smacks. The effect on morale was terrific. As they staggered back to their chores, Marilyn’s be-lipsticked beneficiaries mumbled dreamily: “We won’t wash our faces for a month.”

Life, March 2 1942 

/ December 09, 2010 / 91

Bookmark and Share


Online Users

Once Upon a Time in War © 2012 Lux
Powered by Tumblr & Apart of Swallow The Sky.



No claim is laid to these photographs unless otherwise noted.
Not profit is made from their use, and assumed to be apart of the public domain.

Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes
such as criticism, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research.