Once Upon a Time in War is a photographic retrospect of the Great War, World War II, the Cold War, and the War on Terror ++about

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Swinging first and swinging to kill is all that matters now.

— War correspondent Ernie Pyle (August 3, 1900 – April 18, 1945)

November 18, 2011, 11:22pm / 12

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21 Battalion, 5 Infantry Brigade, 2nd New Zealand Division in Italy, moving in to relieve the 28 (Maori) Battalion near the front, 9 January 1945.

21 Battalion, 5 Infantry Brigade, 2nd New Zealand Division in Italy, moving in to relieve the 28 (Maori) Battalion near the front, 9 January 1945.

/ November 18, 2011 / 17

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mercurials replied to your post: Whats your view…

smh.com.au/nationa…

krad-eelav replied to your post: Whats your…

I think the official reason said it was concerns about China.

fallschirmjager replied to your post: Whats your view…

They are stationed there for rapid deployment in SE Asia.

Reasons why I love y’all. I get too behind in the news when swamped with work and uni however after reading a few more articles thanks to google, all I can say is my history senses are tingling.

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November 18, 2011, 10:10pm / 0

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Anonymous said: Whats your view on USA stationing marines in Australia?

How fast and how low would everyone’s opinion of me drop if I said I had no idea we were putting Marines with our cousins down under?

tbh I can’t think of why would we need to or why Australia would let us. Am I missing a large chunk of information or are we prepping for when New Zealand finally wages war with the armies of Mordor

Tell me more anon, I am interested in hearing about this.

November 18, 2011, 9:59pm / 25

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Photograph

A soldier of the 1st Infantry Division about to clear out a VC tunnel, armed only with a flashlight and a .45-caliber pistol. The duty of a Tunnel Rat has always been described perfectly in The Things They Carried by Tim O’Brien:

Whoever drew the number 17 would strip off his gear and crawl headfirst with a flashlight and Lieutenant Cross’s .45-caliber pistol. The rest of them would fan out as security. They would sit down or kneel, not facing the hole, listening to the ground beneath them, imagining cobwebs and ghosts, whatever was down there—the tunnel walls squeezing in—how the flashlight seemed impossibly heavy in the hand and how it was tunnel vision in the very strictest sense, compression in all ways, even time, and how you had to wiggle in—ass and elbows—a swallowed-up feeling—and how you found yourself worrying about odd things: Will your flashlight go dead? Do rats carry rabies? If you screamed, how far would the sound carry? Would your buddies hear it? Would they have the courage to drag you out? In some respects, though not many, the waiting was worse than the tunnel itself. Imagination was a killer.

A soldier of the 1st Infantry Division about to clear out a VC tunnel, armed only with a flashlight and a .45-caliber pistol. The duty of a Tunnel Rat has always been described perfectly in The Things They Carried by Tim O’Brien:

Whoever drew the number 17 would strip off his gear and crawl headfirst with a flashlight and Lieutenant Cross’s .45-caliber pistol. The rest of them would fan out as security. They would sit down or kneel, not facing the hole, listening to the ground beneath them, imagining cobwebs and ghosts, whatever was down there—the tunnel walls squeezing in—how the flashlight seemed impossibly heavy in the hand and how it was tunnel vision in the very strictest sense, compression in all ways, even time, and how you had to wiggle in—ass and elbows—a swallowed-up feeling—and how you found yourself worrying about odd things: Will your flashlight go dead? Do rats carry rabies? If you screamed, how far would the sound carry? Would your buddies hear it? Would they have the courage to drag you out? In some respects, though not many, the waiting was worse than the tunnel itself. Imagination was a killer.

/ November 18, 2011 / 105

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Photograph

The frozen corpses of Marines left abandoned at the Battle of Unsan, one of the most shameful moments in the history of the US military. Their bodies, once discovered by the Chinese troops, were stripped of their belongings and clothing, then left to rot.

The frozen corpses of Marines left abandoned at the Battle of Unsan, one of the most shameful moments in the history of the US military. Their bodies, once discovered by the Chinese troops, were stripped of their belongings and clothing, then left to rot.

/ November 18, 2011 / 66

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mrsjaggerdagger said: I'm not really sure about French Nazi. I mean of course there was collaborators. Some of them were really linked and closed with German Nazi. Pétain was the number one actually. But there never was a nazi parti in France.

Yeah, I mean, fascist parties in the same vein of Fascist Italy and Mussolini weren’t uncommon (there was one in Britain, Bulgaria and Romania) but French Nazis, in the sense of following the strict Nazi doctrine, I’ve never heard of, not even the concept.

The French collaborators really just wanted to bring back the glory of the French Empire and get rid of the “bourgeoisie” attitudes.

November 18, 2011, 6:54pm / 1

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Anonymous said: My friend insists that French Nazi existed. Not the German/Nazi occupation of France, simply French Nazis. Is this true because I have tried to read on it and I cannot find anything. thank you!

I’m rather confused by this question. Does your friend mean Vichy (the French collaborators who rounded by French Jews on all their own lonesome) or French citizens who formed their own Nazi-esque party like in the US…?

November 18, 2011, 6:44pm / 2

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