Once Upon a Time in War is a photographic retrospect of the Great War, World War II, the Cold War, and the War on Terror ++about

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Yontan Airfield, Okinawa/April 1945

Yontan Airfield, Okinawa/April 1945

(Source: Flickr / usmcarchives)

December 19, 2013, 3:00pm / 56

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John Basilone and Carolyn Orehovic posing for a photograph at Herb Sachs’ Del Rio in Washington, DC/October 1943

(Source: Flickr / usmcarchives)

December 19, 2013, 2:00pm / 76

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Three Marines (PFC Lester C. Walker, Corp. Francis T. Penrodk, and PFC Frank Bondelk) with their was dogs, Zingo, Jack, and Major, climb hills in Southern Okinawa looking for Japanese soliders who might have hidden in caves/Okinawa 1945

Three Marines (PFC Lester C. Walker, Corp. Francis T. Penrodk, and PFC Frank Bondelk) with their was dogs, Zingo, Jack, and Major, climb hills in Southern Okinawa looking for Japanese soliders who might have hidden in caves/Okinawa 1945

(Source: Flickr / usmcarchives)

December 19, 2013, 1:00pm / 22

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Okinawa, 1945

Okinawa, 1945

(Source: Flickr / usmcarchives)

December 19, 2013, 12:17pm / 75

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U.S. Army Pfc. Michael McKinney, a combat infantryman with the 1st Platoon, Delaware Company, Team Apache, 1st Battalion, 501st Infantry Regiment, Task Force 4-25, climbs a hill during a patrol to search for weapons caches outside Saparah, Khost province, Afghanistan, Aug. 1, 2012.

U.S. Army Pfc. Michael McKinney, a combat infantryman with the 1st Platoon, Delaware Company, Team Apache, 1st Battalion, 501st Infantry Regiment, Task Force 4-25, climbs a hill during a patrol to search for weapons caches outside Saparah, Khost province, Afghanistan, Aug. 1, 2012.

(Source: Flickr / soldiersmediacenter)

December 19, 2013, 12:00pm / 41

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Engineers with the 569th Engineer Company, Fort Carson, Colo., provide dismounted security for Air Force Tech. Sgt. Michael Myers and his military working dog Rambo while clearing a hill of IED threats along a route used during Operation Southern Strike III in the district of Takhteh Pol, Kandahar province, Afghanistan/7 Sept. 2012.

Engineers with the 569th Engineer Company, Fort Carson, Colo., provide dismounted security for Air Force Tech. Sgt. Michael Myers and his military working dog Rambo while clearing a hill of IED threats along a route used during Operation Southern Strike III in the district of Takhteh Pol, Kandahar province, Afghanistan/7 Sept. 2012.

(Source: Flickr / soldiersmediacenter)

December 18, 2013, 5:00pm / 21

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Sergeant Basilone was killed by an enemy mortar round at approximately 10:45 AM on February 19, 1945. He suffered massive abdominal wounds but lingered for approximately twenty minutes before succumbing from shock and loss of blood. Four Marines died from the same explosion. His last words were spoken to a Navy corpsman who attended to him following the explosion. That corpsman has vowed never to reveal those final words.
For his fearless leadership, his daring attack on the enemy bunker and successful capture of the first objective of C Company on Iwo Jima, he was awarded to Navy’s highest honor, the Navy Cross. He also received the Purple Heart for wounds received that day. Sergeant Basilone is buried in Arlington National Cemetery in section 12, grave 384.
…Like his mentor Chesty Puller, Sergeant Basilone has become a legend in the Marine Corps. At the entrance to his hometown of Raritan, New Jersey, a bronze statue of him stands silent guard, on a small median strip. The section of Interstate Route 5 that passes by Camp Pendleton in Oceanside, California, is called the Basilone Memorial Highway. His heroic exploits are recounted for every new Marine as a part of their education in the finest traditions of the Corps.
Sergeant Basilone, in his personal humility and unwavering dedication to the men who served with him, became a true hero of the American people during World War II. His courage eased their fears during many dark hours when the outcome of the war was uncertain. His cheerful, good nature in spite of his own psychological and physical suffering gave them hope. His tireless service, whether fighting or rallying support for the troops, helped Americans bear the hardships of wartime.
America owes a debt of remembrance to Sergeant Basilone and all the thousands of men and women who served to protect the country…to remember their sacrifices is to honor them.

Sergeant Basilone was killed by an enemy mortar round at approximately 10:45 AM on February 19, 1945. He suffered massive abdominal wounds but lingered for approximately twenty minutes before succumbing from shock and loss of blood. Four Marines died from the same explosion. His last words were spoken to a Navy corpsman who attended to him following the explosion. That corpsman has vowed never to reveal those final words.

For his fearless leadership, his daring attack on the enemy bunker and successful capture of the first objective of C Company on Iwo Jima, he was awarded to Navy’s highest honor, the Navy Cross. He also received the Purple Heart for wounds received that day. Sergeant Basilone is buried in Arlington National Cemetery in section 12, grave 384.

…Like his mentor Chesty Puller, Sergeant Basilone has become a legend in the Marine Corps. At the entrance to his hometown of Raritan, New Jersey, a bronze statue of him stands silent guard, on a small median strip. The section of Interstate Route 5 that passes by Camp Pendleton in Oceanside, California, is called the Basilone Memorial Highway. His heroic exploits are recounted for every new Marine as a part of their education in the finest traditions of the Corps.

Sergeant Basilone, in his personal humility and unwavering dedication to the men who served with him, became a true hero of the American people during World War II. His courage eased their fears during many dark hours when the outcome of the war was uncertain. His cheerful, good nature in spite of his own psychological and physical suffering gave them hope. His tireless service, whether fighting or rallying support for the troops, helped Americans bear the hardships of wartime.

America owes a debt of remembrance to Sergeant Basilone and all the thousands of men and women who served to protect the country…to remember their sacrifices is to honor them.

(Source: Flickr / usmcarchives)

December 18, 2013, 4:00pm / 94

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Sgt. Tyler J. Plummer mainting security as a tower guard in an outpost in the Paktya Province, Afghanistan/15 June 2013

Sgt. Tyler J. Plummer mainting security as a tower guard in an outpost in the Paktya Province, Afghanistan/15 June 2013

(Source: Flickr / soldiersmediacenter)

December 18, 2013, 3:00pm / 55

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