Once Upon a Time in War is a photographic retrospect of the Great War, World War II, the Cold War, and the War on Terror ++about

Owner: Lux, UCF student of history

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Quote
You can only faintly imagine this terrible scene of desolation. War is worse than hell.

— Captain Elliott, of the Kansas Regiment, February 1899

May 10, 2012, 2:42pm / 30

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Marines landing on Saipan.

Marines landing on Saipan.

/ May 10, 2012 / 36

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A US Marine and his dog on Iwo

A US Marine and his dog on Iwo

/ May 10, 2012 / 123

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Quote
It was so savage. We were savages…We had all become hardened. We were out there, human beings, the most highly developed form of life on earth, fighting each other like wild animals.

— US Marine E.B. “Sledgehammer” Sledge on the fighting in the Pacific.

May 10, 2012, 12:42pm / 47

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The “Field of Flags” was dedicated on Sunday, October 23, 2005 at the Somers Congregational Church in Somers, Connecticut. Members of the Memorial Garden Committee of the Somers Congregational Church placed 2,231 American flags, one for each American casualty in Iraq and Afghanistan. The flags were placed to honor those who have given their lives in the conflicts and to show that those who have died and their families and friends were remembered in prayer at our church.The list of casualties, by state, was displayed on a name board by the Field of Flags showing the name and rank of each American casualty. A notebook was kept in the church building with the name, rank, town, state and date of death for each American casualty.The idea for the Field of Flags came about as members of the Memorial Garden Committee considered what our church could do to show support for our troops. Each casualty reminded us of the danger and increased the empathy we felt for the families of those who have died.The Field of Flags had more impact than the committee envisioned with the media coverage and the emotional reaction from our community and beyond. People came from towns across the state and out of state to see the flags and view the name board. Individuals and families have found the display to be emotional, yet comforting to know that their loved ones have been remembered.The Field of Flags is a silent, patriotic and poignant reminder of the cost of war. Each flag represents not simply one casualty, but all the family members and friends who have been touched by that life now gone. They represent our respect for those who have served and are currently serving inthe military and our hope for peace in the future, for a time when no one is called upon by our country to give the greatest sacrifice. Please continue to pray for the safety of all of our troops and for the families of the fallen heroes.In 2010, South Congregational Church of East Hartford made a request of the Somers Church to have the Field of Flags here. At that time, we were told there was a two year wait. Late in 2011, we were notified that the month of May 2012 was available. Our Memorial Garden Committee, under the leadership of Peggy Schoen, took on the responsibility of this meaningful memorial, and on Friday, May 4, 2012, members of the Somers Church, joined by ~ 55 volunteers from our church and the community of East Hartford, transformed the entire front expanse of our church, into a sea of American flags, which now number 6,437. The display will remain here through Memorial Day weekend, at which time it will be dismantled, and ultimately moved to its next destination, the United Methodist Church in Bristol, CT.

The “Field of Flags” was dedicated on Sunday, October 23, 2005 at the Somers Congregational Church in Somers, Connecticut. Members of the Memorial Garden Committee of the Somers Congregational Church placed 2,231 American flags, one for each American casualty in Iraq and Afghanistan. The flags were placed to honor those who have given their lives in the conflicts and to show that those who have died and their families and friends were remembered in prayer at our church.

The list of casualties, by state, was displayed on a name board by the Field of Flags showing the name and rank of each American casualty. A notebook was kept in the church building with the name, rank, town, state and date of death for each American casualty.

The idea for the Field of Flags came about as members of the Memorial Garden Committee considered what our church could do to show support for our troops. Each casualty reminded us of the danger and increased the empathy we felt for the families of those who have died.

The Field of Flags had more impact than the committee envisioned with the media coverage and the emotional reaction from our community and beyond. People came from towns across the state and out of state to see the flags and view the name board. Individuals and families have found the display to be emotional, yet comforting to know that their loved ones have been remembered.

The Field of Flags is a silent, patriotic and poignant reminder of the cost of war. Each flag represents not simply one casualty, but all the family members and friends who have been touched by that life now gone. They represent our respect for those who have served and are currently serving in
the military and our hope for peace in the future, for a time when no one is called upon by our country to give the greatest sacrifice. Please continue to pray for the safety of all of our troops and for the families of the fallen heroes.

In 2010, South Congregational Church of East Hartford made a request of the Somers Church to have the Field of Flags here. At that time, we were told there was a two year wait. Late in 2011, we were notified that the month of May 2012 was available. Our Memorial Garden Committee, under the leadership of Peggy Schoen, took on the responsibility of this meaningful memorial, and on Friday, May 4, 2012, members of the Somers Church, joined by ~ 55 volunteers from our church and the community of East Hartford, transformed the entire front expanse of our church, into a sea of American flags, which now number 6,437. The display will remain here through Memorial Day weekend, at which time it will be dismantled, and ultimately moved to its next destination, the United Methodist Church in Bristol, CT.

/ May 09, 2012 / 23

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Norman Hatch, whose war experience was featured in the History seriesWWII in HD, feeding the kitten he adopted during island hopping.

Norman Hatch, whose war experience was featured in the History seriesWWII in HD, feeding the kitten he adopted during island hopping.

/ May 09, 2012 / 167

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Mount Austen, Guadalcanal

Mount Austen, Guadalcanal

/ May 09, 2012 / 98

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/ May 09, 2012 / 49

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