Once Upon a Time in War is a photographic retrospect of the Great War, World War II, the Cold War, and the War on Terror ++about

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Members of the Canadian Women’s Army Corps (C.W.A.C) take part in a firefighting exercise. Various tasks were ably undertaken by women, freeing men for combat when there was a crying need for more manpower.

Members of the Canadian Women’s Army Corps (C.W.A.C) take part in a firefighting exercise. Various tasks were ably undertaken by women, freeing men for combat when there was a crying need for more manpower.

  via: womenatwar / July 28, 2014 / 99

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Troops of the 1st Battalion, the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders (15th Division), billeted in a ruined house in Arras, 18 October 1917.

Troops of the 1st Battalion, the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders (15th Division), billeted in a ruined house in Arras, 18 October 1917.

Source / July 28, 2014 / 32

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Video

Austria-Hungary declares war on Serbia, 28 July 1914

It’s one month to the day after Serbian nationalists killed Archduke Franz Ferdinand and the Duchess of Hohenberg that Austria-Hungary declares war on Serbia. The action effectively begins the irreversible steps that lead to the Great War, and the destruction of Western Europe.

After a month, Austria-Hungary had determined that a proper measured response to the assassination of their royals was possible military invasion of Serbia. It’s with unconditional support from Germany—the so-called Blank Check assurance on 5 July—that allows Austria-Hungary to present Serbia with an ultimatum on 23 July 1914: the Empire demands a list of things, but among them that all anti-Austrian propaganda within Serbia to be suppressed, and that Austria-Hungary be given full reign of conducting their own investigation into the Archduke’s murder. Serbia grudgingly accepted the terms, only to have the Austrian government break diplomatic relations.

In an effort to stop the building conflict from bursting, the British Foreign Office lobbied in partnership with French officials in Berlin, Paris and Rome to bring the countries to a table. They fail; the German government wants no part in peace. They advise Vienna to go ahead, and when Austria-Hungary declares war on Serbia on 28 July 1914, Russia (the protector of the Balkans) fully mobilizes its military. 

That night, Austrian artillery initiate bombardment of Belgrade.

By 1 August 1914, Germany has declared war on Russia.
By 3 August 1914, Germany has declared war on France.

The Great War has begun.

July 28, 2014, 2:00pm / 149

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Son and father, reuinted after deportation to Siberia by the Soviets, serve in the same regiment of the 2nd Polish Corps while in Italy.

Son and father, reuinted after deportation to Siberia by the Soviets, serve in the same regiment of the 2nd Polish Corps while in Italy.

Source / July 28, 2014 / 41

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Soldiers of the King’s African Rifles (KAR) during the British advance into Italian Somaliland/13 Feb 1941

Soldiers of the King’s African Rifles (KAR) during the British advance into Italian Somaliland/13 Feb 1941

Source / July 28, 2014 / 65

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Video

Manhattan, the new series from WGN America starting tonight at 9 EST about the building of the world’s first atomic weapon.

July 27, 2014, 8:39pm / 57

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Photograph

British wounded being treated, and Italian prisoners waiting to be evacuated from the beach on the first day of the invasion of Sicily, 10 July 1943.

British wounded being treated, and Italian prisoners waiting to be evacuated from the beach on the first day of the invasion of Sicily, 10 July 1943.

Source / July 27, 2014 / 34

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Sergeant P Hopkinson of the Royal Engineers, who was the first Allied soldier to be attached to an Italian Unit after the Armistice, with Italian artillerymen who are explaining shell markings to him.

Sergeant P Hopkinson of the Royal Engineers, who was the first Allied soldier to be attached to an Italian Unit after the Armistice, with Italian artillerymen who are explaining shell markings to him.

Source / July 27, 2014 / 50

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